Information about woodlice

Woodlice in the genus Armadillidium, family Armadillidae, for example, when threatened, roll up into an almost perfect sphere, hence the name pill bug or roly-poly.

Do woodlice bite

The woodlouse is generally about 1 cm long but many species in the tropics are triple that size , some are even bigger. The latter is because they rapidly lose water, both through cuticles and by excretion. The woodlouse feeds on decaying leaf and plant matter on the forest floor, meaning that the woodlouse plays a vital role in the natural carbon dioxide cycle. There are more than 5, known species of woodlice, the most common of which are: Armadillidium vulgare also known as the pill wood louse ; Oniscus asellus also known as the common wood louse ; Porcellio scaber. It has a long, segmented exoskeleton, which is rigid and must be progressively shed as it grows, in order to allow further development. Being so adaptable, woodlice can be found in a variety of habitats, from forests and jungles, to deserts. Woodlouse has one pair of antennas on top of the head. The species does this to recycle copper in their diet as their blood is copper-based like marine crustaceans. This moult is composed of 2 stages: first the back half, then, days later, the front half.

Evolutionary ancient species are amphibious, such as the marine-intertidal sea slater Ligia oceanicawhich belongs to family Ligiidae. Buglife is the only organisation in Europe devoted to the conservation of all invertebrates.

The latter is because they rapidly lose water, both through cuticles and by excretion.

how do woodlice breathe

Other examples include some Haloniscus species from Australia family Scyphacidaeand in the northern hemisphere several species of Trichoniscidae and Thailandoniscus annae family Styloniscidae. The woodlouse is a herbivorous animal and therefore only eats organic plant matter.

where do woodlice live

The woodlouse is the only species of crustacean to inhabit inland and not watery habitats. The woodlouse is found in nearly every environment in the world besides the polar regions and the arid desert.

Do woodlice have eyes

Woodlice are actually the only crustacean that do not live in the water. Bi-colored, pink-grey animals can be seen in between these two phases. The reason why there are 2 stages to the moulting process has to do with minimizing the vulnerability of the woodlouse during the period, however short, it is without its armour. The woodlouse is generally about 1 cm long but many species in the tropics are triple that size , some are even bigger. Being so adaptable, woodlice can be found in a variety of habitats, from forests and jungles, to deserts. Description and distribution A woodlouse is an isopod crustacean. Ligia oceanica is aquatic. Five groups that classify all living things Animalia A group of animals within the animal kingdom Arthropoda A group of animals within a pylum Crustacea A group of animals within a class Isopoda A group of animals within an order Oniscidea Most widely used name for this species Woodlouse The name of the animal in science Oniscidea The place where something is found Worldwide What kind of foods the animal eats Herbivore How long L or tall H the animal is mm 0. Depending on the species, females can lay eggs up to 3 times a year, with approximately 50 eggs being laid at a time. Interesting Woodlouse Facts: Most species of woodlouse can reach 0. Woodlice in the genus Armadillidium, family Armadillidae, for example, when threatened, roll up into an almost perfect sphere, hence the name pill bug or roly-poly. The woodlouse is the only species of crustacean to inhabit inland and not watery habitats. There are more than 5, known species of woodlice, the most common of which are: Armadillidium vulgare also known as the pill wood louse ; Oniscus asellus also known as the common wood louse ; Porcellio scaber. Generally, woodlice will be grey or brown in colour and measure around 1cm, although tropical species can grow up to 3 times larger.
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Common woodlouse